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Compare Domino Server/Configuration Documents

This is a really good tip for checking what changes have been made to Server and Configuration documents over the lifetime of a server and can be really useful when a  number of changes have been made in a short period of time especially when things are not working correctly!

If you open up the IBM_TECHNICAL_SUPPORT folder on the Domino server (within the data folder), look files with a DXL extension.

EVERY change made to a Server and Configuration document for that server will be stored here in a DXL file in the format:-

serverdoc_servername_date@time.dxl (server documents)

or configspecific_servername_date@time.dxl  (server specific configuration documents)

or configall_servername_date@time.dxl  (default configuration documents)

(where “servername” is the name of the server, “date” is the date a change was made, and “time” is the time the change was made at).
Now there are many sophisticated LotusScript ways to convert a DXL file into a readable format in a Notes database but there is an out of box solution that doesn’t involve any interaction with developers (and it’s free!).

You’ll need to download the Lotus Notes Diagnostic (LND) Utility http://www-01.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=swg24019151 (also very handy for troubleshooting crashes) .
Download and install it choosing your local Notes program folder and launch.  Accept the ECL alerts and an LND Notes database will open. To open a server or config doc DXL file click on the LND header in the database:-

LND File Open

When prompted for a file, browse to the appropriate DXL file  It will reformat into a new Server/Configuration document within the LND application. You’ll be able to compare this and every DXL file to each other or your current server/config document and find out what changes have been made. The compare process is a bit laborious but it could be a lifesaver !

Please let us know if you find this tip helpful!

Thanks,

Cormac